How To: Foam Soap Refill

Cheap.

soap refill

Top: Refill ready to use!
Bottom: Water and soap in the bottle almost ready to shake together.

Okay, I’m not cheap. I’m frugal. Or as my mom used to tell me, “Lauren, you have a lobster taste on a beer budget.” And I’m proud to say I’ve lived up to that phrase my whole life. So, when I went to Target the other day to buy a foam soap refill, I was blown away at how much it cost.

Now, don’t get me wrong. I love Target and all of their wonderful treasures. However, I figured why should I buy a refill if I could make it myself for pretty much nada. So I came back home, did some research and dug around underneath the sink to make my own. One bottle of soap, an empty foam soap container and some water later, and voilà – a foam soap refill for practically nothing!

What you’ll need to make a Foam Soap Refill is:

  • 1 Tablespoon of liquid soap, any kind
  • An empty and clean foam soap container
  • Warm water (the amount of water will depend on the size of your bottle)

Then:

  1. Fill the foam soap container with warm water – I used about a cup, but you can just fill it up so the container is 75%-ish full
  2. Add a tablespoon of soap
  3. And shake!

*If you want your refill to more “soapy”, just use some more soap in the mixture.

Since the bottle of soap I had on hand was 10 fluid ounces, I’m able to make 20 refills from it. Now, let’s do some math real fast – if one bottle of foam soap refill costs $3.50, 20 refills would add up to $70. Or you could buy one 10 fl. oz.  bottle of soap for $3.50 or less and have 20 refills for just how much it cost you to buy that bottle of soap.

Makes sense just to make it on your own right? So go ahead and try it!

Lauren

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DIY: Ranger Beads

A.k.a. Pace Counters.
Since moving to Washington, I’ve realized that most people up here consider 50 degrees outside to be practically summer. I never understood this until recently though when the clouds split, the sun came out and the air was crisp, yet warm. It was an absolutely beautiful day and the perfect temperature to go hiking.

While I ended up staying inside doing some much needed laundry, I decided that next time the sun came out and the weather was nice that I would be prepared. So that next weekend, Blair and I made some pace counters for us to use when we do decide to go out on a hike.

To Army guys, pace counters are also known as Ranger Beads. When going out on their 4+ kilometer ruck marches, Ranger Beads help them keep track of how far they have gone and how much farther they may have to go. At a Army surplus store, these little guys can cost up to $13, where as this DIY comes out to be about $1 a piece. Talk about a bargain, right?!

kilometer2

The quick explanation on how to use a pace counter goes like this: There are 1000 meters to every kilometer – so every 100 meters you walk you would slide a meter bead down to the bottom. When you get to the point that you would slide the “10th bead” down, you have gone a kilometer! So go ahead and slide 1 kilometer bead down, and reset your meter beads back to the top.

*While dependent on the length of your stride, my husband and his buddies average about 65 steps per 100 meters (1 meter bead).

**There IS NOT a 10th meter bead! But when it is time to pull that “10th bead” down, you are going to pull a kilometer bead down. So, 10th bead = 1 kilometer bead!

To make these, you’ll need:

  • 550 Chord (a.k.a. Parachute Chord) divided into 25 in. sections (remove the white inner strings to make it less bulky)
  • 13 Black Pony Beads
  • Tweezer
  • Scissor
  • Lighter
  • Ruler

test

After folding a 25 inch piece of 550 chord in fold in half, make a knot about an inch down. *This will make the loop for you to be able to hang it on belt loops or ruck sacks.

  • Step 1.Then take the ends and cut them at a narrow angle. You’ll want to carefully reconnect the loose strings of each end by warming it with a lighter and pressing it firmly together with your fingers. *TIP: Make sure to not cut too much away from the ends – you’ll need all of the chord!
  • Step 2. Add the 4 kilometer beads and knot the section off. Leave enough space to slide the beads up and down and to be able to tell which ones you have slid down already! *TIP: Use the tweezers to pull the chord ends through the bead.
  • Step 3. Add the 9 meter beads. Again, leave space to be able to slide them up and down. Then finalize the whole thing off with the last knot.

*TIP: Sway the lighter under each knot as you go to tighten the knot. Since the 550 chord shrinks under heat, this will prevent the knots from ever moving!

This is one of those DIY’s that the second one is always better, so don’t worry if the first one isn’t perfect. With the cost of all the supplies being so cheap, practicing on the first one won’t make you bankrupt! I’m excited to make some for myself that aren’t so Army-ish – maybe a pink one or something like that. But in the end all I can say is that I’m really looking forward to the sun coming out one of these weekends so I can try this little guy out with Blair on one of the many Washington hiking trails nearby!

Lauren

*This post was influenced by Army Ranger Beads on instructables.com.

What Big Eyelashes You Have!

Okay. Okay.

I’m not going to lie – I do have naturally long eyelashes (thanks to my beautiful mama!), but I’m all for making them even longer and healthier! And with it being the new year, I’ve been trying to stay on top of keeping my skin and hair in good condition before they naturally start going downhill with age.

Like most girls, I love my mascara and liquid eyeliner, but I can tell they definitley take a toll on my lashes. Lost eyelashes are not uncommon for me – and by lost I mean they straight up fall out.

So what do I do to keep them healthy and grow? I rub baby oil on my eyelashes!

Now that might seem weird, but I can tell you that over the past month of doing this religiously before I go to bed that it has worked wonders. I’ve noticed even longer and thicker lashes, less lost eyelashes and when they are lost, quicker growth.

I personally use Walmart’s generic lavender baby oil (mild formula). It costs only $2.47 for a 14 oz. bottle, so it fits well into my Army budget. Much more cost effective than going out and buying a product that is mind-blowingly expensive, right?

Not a great picture, but hey you get the point!

Not a great picture, but hey you get the point!

All I simply do is:

1. Remove my makeup – I use Pond’s Cold Cream with a washcloth and it too works wonders!

2. Wash my face. *Wash your face accordingly to your skin type. This is vital to keeping away blemishes!

3. Get a Q-tip and gently squeeze the bottle of baby oil on the end of it until it is moistened.

4. Do a sweeping motion along the top and bottom lash line. This part is actually quite relaxing for me. 🙂

5. Flip the Q-tip to the other end and repeat steps 3 and 4 on the other eye. *You’ll want to use the other end of the Q-tip on the other eye for sanitary reasons. That way you prevent anything you might have in one eye from transferring to the other!

* I personally have sensitive skin and have no problems doing this. However, do test it on one eye before doing it on both!

Sadly with things like this, you have to have patience and work on making it a routine. But if you do, the results are well worth it! So go ahead and give it a try!

Lauren